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IVC Filters

An Inferior Vena Cava (IVC) filter is a device implanted in the veins of patients in order to catch blood clots, preventing them from moving to the lungs. IVC filters are a spider-like configuration of wires implanted into veins of patients who cannot take blood thinners. The IVC filterss are intended to catch blood clots, which will dissipate without complications over time.

Permanent IVC filters have been used since the 1960s, but recent temporary IVC filters have proven dangerous. Approved for use in the United States in 2003, these temporary, retrievable filters have led to complications when doctors have left them in patients permanently. In many cases, these retrievable IVC filters have eroded and fractured and moved into the blood stream where they can damage organs.

The Locks Law Firm is currently reviewing cases on behalf of individuals and their family members who have suffered IVC filter-related injuries, including IVC filter erosion, fracture, and migration as well as organ perforation.

FDA Warnings

In 2010, the FDA warned the retrievable filters posed risks of filter fracture, device migration and organ perforation and should be removed as soon as the patient's risk for blood clots subsided. Although the filters were designed to prevent life-threatening pulmonary embolisms (PEs – blood clots in the lungs), they can have life-threatening side effects. In a report released in 2010, the FDA received more than 900 reports of adverse events associated with IVC filters.

The FDA updated safety communication in 2014, stating most devices should be removed between the 29th and 54th day after implantation.

Contact a Locks Law Firm IVC Filter Lawyer

If you or a loved one has suffered complications from an IVC filter, contact the Locks Law Firm today. We urge you to contact us immediately as all claims are subject to strict requirements on when a case must be filed. Our attorneys can provide information about filing an IVC filter lawsuit during a free, confidential consultation and case evaluation.

 

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